The Village of Cambridge-Narrows

What's Coming Up?

 

COVID-19 Precautions

 

The health and safety of citizens is of the utmost importance , therefore the following precautions are being taken:

 

 

All activities, programs and scheduled meetings are cancelled until further notice.

 

The Municipal Building has been closed to all groups, organizations and general public until further notice

 

The Cambridge-Narrows Regional Library is closed until further notice.

 

The office is still operational but is closed to the public until further notice.

 

We will continue to monitor the current situation, and will post updates on our website

For any questions, please call the office at 488-3155 or email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Council encourages all residents to practice safe distancing, if you are experiencing any symptoms, please contact telecare 811. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

       

Public Notice

 

 

Public Notice:  Road Closure

Route 695, in the area of Den Valley Hill, Cambridge-Narrows is closed to thru traffic.  Detour via Knight Road 

Closure is until further notice.  For updates http://www.511.gnb.ca/en/map.html or https://511.gnb.ca/en/mobile/

 

 

 

Originally founded as two settlements: Cambridge and The Narrows, one on either side of the Washademoak Lake. Government merged the two settlements in 1966 to form Cambridge-Narrows.


The Village of Cambridge-Narrows is located in South-Central New Brunswick on the picturesque Washademoak lake; where unspoiled landscape, scenic views, and local hospitality give the community it's country charm.

 

The village is home to approximately 650 residents with three local campgrounds that attract a considerable number of residents during the summer months. Known as "Cottage Country", the village is also "home" to a number of seasonal cottage dwellers.

 

 

Local Area History

 

Long before Europeans arrived in Cambridge-Narrows, the first peoples were using the Washademoak Lake as a major trade route between the Bay of Fundy and the St. John river.

 

They fished the generous waters and hunted in the rich forests. The lake was well known to the natives as its southeastern shore (near Crafts Cove) provided chert, a stone used in toolmaking.

 

 

 

 

The Europeans and the Loyalists picked up on the bountiful nature of the Cambridge-Narrows area. Towering old growth forests yielded timber which fed the mills. The mills produced lumber for houses and shipbuilding. Cleared fields became farms which provided sustenance for the early inhabitants. The lake provided transportation routes for the riverboats that would arrive.

 

 

 

And arrive they did! The riverboats defined an era for the village of Cambridge-Narrows. That era lasted from the mid-19th century until the last riverboat left the Washademoak Lake in 1947.

 

Riverboats like the Majestic brought supplies to the general stores and farmers shipped out their produce to feed the city of Saint John and beyond. In the waining years of the riverboat era, the boats introduced tourism to the area.

 

 

 

 

Passengers came to the shores of the Washademoak and stayed at the Cambridge Hotel or the Washademoak Lodge. Tourism remains an important industry in the area to this day with cottagers flocking to the village during the summer months.